About this Blog

I started this blog in 2007 while in undergrad, as a means of improving my scientific writing skills and reviewing a book or two now and then (not always chemistry related). Since then, I’ve been through graduate school—specializing in the intersection of organic chemistry and educational technology—and gone on to a teaching faculty position at the Georgia Institute of Technology.

Basically, there are very few good chemical education blogs out there, so I hope to fill that niche as best I can. My teaching life is filled with enough anecdotes to fill countless volumes, so I hope my little corner of the universe is useful to anyone out there interested in the teaching or practice of chemistry.

For more of my writings and other projects, check out http://www.metallacycle.com.

Advertisements

6 Comments

  1. Hi, I’m a student in the education program at the University of Maine in Farmington. I want to use your picture of the British flag for my Webquest on the American Revolution. A webquest is an activity students will perform using the internet to gather information. I want to use the graphic to add to the webpage to make it more visually appealing. Please let me know if that is fine with you.
    Thank you.

    Reply

  2. Our website Science.org is a informational databases and online news publication for anything and everything related to science and technology. We recently ran a poll asking our website users regarding what online informational resources they use to keep up to date or even to simply find great information. It seems many of our users have labeled your blog as an excellent source of Space information. We have reviewed your blog and must say, we absolutely love the information you have made available to the public and would love to make your blog a part of our top science blogs. After browsing your blog, our research team has decided to award you a Top science Blogs award banner.

    Reply

  3. well, you helped me a lot about “acetonitrile” which I got into while reading an article about photoinitiated bond dissociation. Thanks a lot!

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s